About This Exhibition

African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center is an exhibition in which works by renowned artists Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, and Sam Gilliam are coupled with the work of exciting new visionaries, including Chakaia Booker, Lorna Simpson, and Kara Walker. This group of artists collectively reflects the growing prominence—and complexity—of the field of African American Art over the last 60 years.

The exhibition is organized by the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora and showcases a generation of artists who opened up the possibilities for African American art, from pursuing pure abstraction to providing a forum for art as political activism. The exhibition also presents the newest voices in African American art which utilize a variety of media and possess a hybrid approach to cultural and social identity.

About the David C. Driskell Center

The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park, celebrates the legacy of David C. Driskell --Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art, Artist, Art Historian, Collector, and Curator-- by preserving the rich heritage of African American visual art and culture. Established in 2001, the Center provides an intellectual home for artists, museum professionals, art administrators, and scholars of color, broadening the field of African diasporic studies. The Driskell Center is committed to collecting, documenting, and presenting African American art as well as replenishing and expanding the field. For further information about the David C. Driskell Center, please visit www.driskellcenter.umd.edu.

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Image credits: Herman Kofi Bailey, Untitled, 1962, Drawing